Tiger At Rest — Monochromia

Tiger At Rest — Monochromia

Tigers have become extinct in Viet Nam, Cambodia and Laos in the past 15 years due to poaching for trophies, capture or exotic dining. Habit loss plays a part, too!

A hundred years ago, there were about 100,000 tigers in Asia, now down to an estimated 3900 in the wild. British overlords took tens of thousands, hunting them from elephants, in colonial times in the earlier part of the twentieth century.

TM

All hell is breaking lose down under, By SunBôw Photo: Bairnsdale, Victoria, Australia, Dec 30, 2019, 10 pm… Bairnsdale is the first town I visited in Australia 3 weeks ago. It’s a couple hours drive east of where I am now, in eastern Victoria. Tonight a vast region around Bairnsdale looks like hell as up […]

via All hell is breaking lose down under — Sasquatch Close Encounter Network for Interspecies Communication

Article and photos from hienalouca.com Palm oil is responsible for the destruction of vast swathes of forestry and is being used in products from a wide range of companies. Food giant Mondelez, which provides palm oil for Cadbury chocolate bars, Ritz crackers and Oreo biscuits, has been named as the worst offender by a Greenpeace report. The damning report found that supplying palm oil to the snacking behemoth has come at the expense of 173,000 acres (70,000 hectares) of rainforest since 2016. Extreme deforestation has pushed local wildlife into tiny corners of their habitat and has forced many species, including the critically endangered orangutans, towards the ‘brink of extinction’, Greenpeace claims. According to the report, twelve brands are using palm oil from 20 suppliers that are all all

via News Pictures – Palm oil from 12 companies driving orangutans to ‘brink of extinction’ — News Exc Celebrity

Last Post for a While…but remember the Gorillas

During this troubled time we are going to take a break from our regular wildlife and environmental postings. In the meantime, we are concerned about the ability of the covid-19 virus’s ability to jump to the gorilla population and the populations of other great apes.
Uganda, and hopefully other African countries, is closing to the piblic the reserve where that country’s population lives. With only an estimated 1000 mountain gorillas in the wild any additional protection is most welcomed. Other risks to all gorilla populations in Africa include illegal ‘bush meat hunting’…

Western Lowland Gorilla

Banner Image: Wild-caught young elephants are held captive in a fenced boma by Zimbabwe authorities awaiting shipment to China in October 2019 © Oscar Nkalain / Humane Society International/Africa – “Opinion: Zimbabwe’s shameful export of baby elephants under the guise of ‘sustainable use’,” Africa Geographic, 18 November 2019 Posted at EMS Foundation, 11 December 2019 Dated […]

via The Free Elephant Network Calls For The End To The Live Elephant Trade Between Zimbabwe and China — International Wildlife Bond

In the war-like ‘theatre’ of organised wildlife crime, versus the authorities and anti-poaching units, where is the current ‘balance’ in this blood filled battle? Ultimately, where are we heading with regard to threatened species? Elephant Poaching Based on CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna) data, African elephant poaching […]

via The ‘Theatre’ of Wildlife Decimation — International Wildlife Bond

“A new United Nations report highlighting the devastating impact of humans on the natural world should serve as an urgent ‘wake-up call’ to policymakers in the Cayman Islands and across the globe, according to a host of environmental officials, researchers and non-profits.” James Whittaker reports for the Cayman Compass, writing about the most threatened animals […]

via Nature’s dangerous decline: 1 million species facing extinction — Repeating Islands

The New York Times The coronavirus epidemic prompted China to permanently ban trade of wild animals as food, but not for medicinal use. China this week announced a permanent ban on wildlife trade and consumption that international conservationists greeted as a major step, but one with troublesome loopholes for trade in wild animals for medicinal […]

via China’s Ban on Wildlife Trade a Big Step, but Has Loopholes — Natural History Wanderings