“A new United Nations report highlighting the devastating impact of humans on the natural world should serve as an urgent ‘wake-up call’ to policymakers in the Cayman Islands and across the globe, according to a host of environmental officials, researchers and non-profits.” James Whittaker reports for the Cayman Compass, writing about the most threatened animals […]

via Nature’s dangerous decline: 1 million species facing extinction — Repeating Islands

ScienceDaily Researchers studied recent extinctions from climate change to estimate the loss of plant and animal species by 2070. Their results suggest that as many as one in three species could face extinction unless warming is reduced. Read article at One-third of plant and animal species could be gone in 50 years — ScienceDaily

via One-third of plant and animal species could be gone in 50 years — Natural History Wanderings

A report from the Caribbean National Weekly. Jamaica has launched a National Tree Planting programme that will aim to plan three million timber and ornamental trees over the next three years. The programme that was recently launched by Prime Minister Andrew Holness, is being managed by the Forestry Department and will see the foresting of 3,000 […]

via Jamaica Government Plants to Plant Three Million Trees in Three Years — Repeating Islands

DALIAN CONFERENCE, PART TWO. The 11th Asia for Animals conference, which took place in Dalian, China, brought together hundreds of delegates from all fields of animal protection, rescue, and advocacy. Focused on how laws can be used creatively to protect nonhuman animals, speakers talked about their successes and challenges, their hopes and their aims. Attendees […]

via Asia for Animals: conference speakers call for tougher laws and changes in behaviour — CHANGING TIMES

Jian Zhong Wang’s home in the southern Chinese city of Nanning is an inviting place. Light spills in through large bay windows, which offer a stunning view of the garden of thick-stemmed banana plants and chest-high cacti. The room is packed with intricately carved furniture: a dining table flanked by eight straight-backed chairs, a coffee […]

via Can forensics help keep endangered rosewood off the black market? — The official Washington D.C. news site – timworld.info