This 8 July 2018 video says about itself: All Crocodile Species Crocodiles (subfamily Crocodylinae) or true crocodiles are large aquatic reptiles that live throughout the tropics in Africa, Asia, the Americas and Australia. Crocodylinae, all of whose members are considered true crocodiles, is classified as a biological subfamily. A broader sense of the term crocodile, […]

via New New Guinean crocodile species discovery — Dear Kitty. Some blog

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Image Credit: Orangutans rescued near a palm oil plantation in Kalimantan, Indonesia. Photograph by Vier Pfoten/Four Paws/Rex It’s the miracle ingredient in everything from biscuits to shampoo. But our dependence on palm oil has devastating environmental consequences. Once upon a time in a land far, far away, there grew a magical fruit. This fruit could […]

via How the world got hooked on palm oil. — Old Guv Legends

JAKARTA SO POLUTED INDONESIAN GOVERNMENT MOVING CAPITOL.


Why bother to clean it up when you can just move the Capitol to another less-polluted city. Indonesia is not exactly at the forefront of conservation as within its boundaries their sub-species of tigers, orangutans, elephants and rhinos (there are others) are at risk in that country wherever they occur, due to habitat loss, palm oil plantations, other types of farming and development, poaching, pollution,climate change, illegal logging, etc, etc; and I guess just not caring enough.
Indonesia is the worlds most populated country on a square foot basis- this is not the wildlife’s fault, though!
TM

Tigers the good news and the bad!

India has been boasting that the Tiger population within its jurisdiction has increased to over 3000 individuals. While this is good and requires congratulations, we should look at the not too distant past for a proper Tiger perspective.
It has been reported that British Colonial hunters, often riding on elephants, killed over 80,000 tigers in the 1920’s. In the late 1950’s there was a total world tiger population of 45,000, plus or minus.
In the 1940’s, the Balinese tiger became extinct. In the 1970’s the Caspian Tiger, which once roamed in Iran, Afghanistan, Iraq, Turkey, southern Russia and elsewhere, became extinct. In the 1980’s the Javan Tiger became extinct. In the 1990’s the South China Tiger was last seen in the wild.
Today, the world Tiger population is believed to be below 5000. In Sumatra the population is believed to be 450-650, but under constant pressure from palm oil producers. The Tiger is extinct in Cambodia, there are 85 in Myanmar, 20 in Vietnam and 252 in Thailand.
Good for India in trying to bring back the populations there. But Tigers are still under siege in India and elsewhere, from hunting, the growth of agriculture, population development pressures, general habitat degradation, etc, etc.
TM