What We’ve Lost: The Species Declared Extinct in 2020 — Repeating Islands

John R. Platt (Scientific American) writes that “Dozens of frogs, fish, orchids and other species—many unseen for decades—may no longer exist because of humanity’s destructive effects on the planet.” His article lists the many species lost in 2020, including 32 orchid species in Bangladesh, the Smooth handfish from Tasmania, 65 North American plants, 22 frog […]

What We’ve Lost: The Species Declared Extinct in 2020 — Repeating Islands

WHY ARE SO MANY PLANTS AND ANIMALS ON THE BRINK OF EXTINCTION? — The Mirror

Extinction is a natural event: animals and plants disappear naturally as time goes by, but – unfortunately – natural extinction is accelerating, due to anthropic factors, involving an increasing number of animals and plants. Natural extionction is usually a consequence of a gradual process, in which the number of animals or plants, belonging to a […]

WHY ARE SO MANY PLANTS AND ANIMALS ON THE BRINK OF EXTINCTION? — The Mirror

Humans waging ‘suicidal war’ on nature – UN chief Antonio Guterres — Natural History Wanderings

BBC News reports “Our planet is broken,” the Secretary General of the United Nations, Antonio Guterres, has warned. Humanity is waging what he describes as a “suicidal” war on the natural world. “Nature always strikes back, and is doing so with gathering force and fury,” he told a BBC special event on the environment. Mr […]

Humans waging ‘suicidal war’ on nature – UN chief Antonio Guterres — Natural History Wanderings

A report from Stony Brook University. Governments must provide larger spatial protections in the Greater Caribbean for threatened, highly migratory species such as sharks, is the call from a diverse group of marine scientists including Stony Brook University School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS) PhD Candidate, Oliver Shipley, and led by the conservation NGO Beneath […]

via Caribbean Sharks in Need of Large Marine Protected Areas — Repeating Islands

“A new United Nations report highlighting the devastating impact of humans on the natural world should serve as an urgent ‘wake-up call’ to policymakers in the Cayman Islands and across the globe, according to a host of environmental officials, researchers and non-profits.” James Whittaker reports for the Cayman Compass, writing about the most threatened animals […]

via Nature’s dangerous decline: 1 million species facing extinction — Repeating Islands

By Safiya Hassan, GLOBUS Correspondent Fishing has quickly become one of Africa’s fastest growing industries, with fisheries found to contribute $24 billion directly to the continent’s economy, accounting for 1.1% of total African GDP. The growth in demand is thought to be spearheaded by China’s trade expansion, in its quest to feed its ever-growing population. However, this has […]

via Africa’s Overfishing Epidemic — GLOBUS

According to a recent U.N. global assessment report, up to one million (that’s 1,000,000!) species are now in danger of extinction, thanks largely to human actions

Eslkevin's Blog

Tomgram: Engelhardt, Pyromaniacs, Inc.

[Note for TomDispatch Readers:On Friday, September 20th, three days before a U.N. climate summit, there will be school strikes across the U.S. of the sort launched by the young Swedish activist, Greta Thunberg. Adults have been urged to offer their support. This aging adult will certainly be at theNew York versionof such events, including a rally to be addressed by Thunberg herself. I urge otherTomDispatchreaders to think about doing the same. Tom]

On the Precipice
The Collective Asteroid of Human History
ByTom Engelhardt

Worlds end. Every day. We all die sooner or later. When you get tomy age, it’s a subject that can’t help but be on your mind.

What’s unusual is this: it’s not just increasingly ancient folks like me who should be thinking such thoughts anymore. After all, worlds of a far larger…

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