We are a nation inhabiting diverse amount of flora and fauna. So, there is greater reason for us to conserve them in their natural habitat. Globally, a lot of faunal Indian species (e.g. Gray Wolf (Canis lupus pallipes), Kalij pheasant (Lophura leucomelanos) have been categorized in IUCN red list as “least concern”, but in India […]

via Wildlife Conservation: Is it enough? — Agenda For Survival

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By Damian Carrington as published on The Guardian The huge loss is a tragedy in itself but also threatens the survival of civilization, say the world’s leading scientists Humanity has wiped out 60% of mammals, birds, fish and reptiles since 1970, leading the world’s foremost experts to warn that the annihilation of wildlife is now an […]

via Humanity has wiped out 60% of animals since 1970, major report finds — Straight from the Horse’s Heart

Tapirs (pronounced tapers) look like weird little pig, panda, anteater things. Their odd looks make them distinct and rememberable. There are five different species of tapir, the Malayan tapir, the mountain tapir, the Brazilian tapir, the little black tapir, and Baird’s tapir. The Malayan tapir is the biggest of these species with the mountain tapirs […]

via Creature Feature: Tapirs! —

Orangutan Mother Seriously Wounded in Air Gun Attack

As industrial organizations continue the drive to increase palm oil plantation production and paper making on the island of Sumatra, this Orangutan suffered serious injuries at the hands of an air-gun toting poacher. The mother Orangutan lost her new born baby as a result of this attack. She had 74 air pellets in her body when rescued by an animal shelter, blinded with six pellets in her eyes, many broken bones, including a broken collarbone.

This is all really sad stuff, not to mention the cruelty of it all, as pressures increase to de-wilderness the island putting at risk the remaining rare populations there of Asian elephants, tigers, rhinos and orangutans (and many others).

Environmental activists: Email, mail, call or text the national and local governments there, including the tourism associations involved with the area.

Some of the irony here is that western heart-related doctors recommend against the consumption of tropical oils (includes palm oil) as being detrimental to health. Maybe that message has not yet reached South East Asia. Palm oil is certainly proving harmful to the animal populations, previously mentioned here.

Lastly, these cruel efforts are reducing the world’s remaining  rain forests — the palm trees, unfortunately, don’t replicate the benefit of dense rain forests…