A new study shows that even the RSPO and POIG certified plantations derive from the recent deforestation of the forests of Southeast Asia Globalization of palm oil represents a serious threat to the biological diversity of Southeast Asia, even when the production is certified as sustainable. For the first time, in fact, a new study […]

via Science confirms: palm oil is unsustainable even if certified — Roberto Cazzolla Gatti

The Mulu Land Grab: New report details multiple legal breaches with oil palm development in Malaysian Borneo Extract from the link . . . A fact-finding mission has shown that, between December 2018 and March 2019, Radiant Lagoon felled an estimated 30,000 cubic meters of timber worth over USD 10 million without a timber extraction […]

via NGOs see Sarawak as dirty backyard of palm oil industry — FernzTheGreat

KUALA LUMPUR, Sept 30 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – Palm oil from an illegal plantation inside an Indonesian rainforest home to endangered orangutans has found its way into the supply chains of major consumer brands including Unilever and Nestle, according to a U.S.-based environmental group. A Rainforest Action Network (RAN) investigation showed Asia-based palm oil traders […]

via Palm oil from ‘orangutan capital of world’ sold to major brands, says forest group — IMURNEWS

Bella Lack, a 16-year-old conservation activist and youth ambassador for The Born Free Foundation, shared her encounter with the last Sumatran rhino in Malaysia on Friday, June 28, alongside a stark message – “this is what extinction looks like.” Tam, the last male Sumatran rhino in Malaysia, died in May, according to the Borneo Rhino Alliance, leaving the female Iman as the last of her species in Malaysia. “Iman is the last flickering flame of 20 million years of the evolution of her species – soon to be extinguished by us,” tweeted Lack. Lack called for people to support the conservation efforts of the Borneo Rhino Alliance. A small number of Sumatran rhinos still survive in Indonesia, according to National Geographic. Credit: Bella Lack via Storyful

via ‘This is What Extinction Looks Like’: British Conservation Activist Meets Last Sumatran Rhino in Malaysia — The Australian

Tigers the good news and the bad!

India has been boasting that the Tiger population within its jurisdiction has increased to over 3000 individuals. While this is good and requires congratulations, we should look at the not too distant past for a proper Tiger perspective.
It has been reported that British Colonial hunters, often riding on elephants, killed over 80,000 tigers in the 1920’s. In the late 1950’s there was a total world tiger population of 45,000, plus or minus.
In the 1940’s, the Balinese tiger became extinct. In the 1970’s the Caspian Tiger, which once roamed in Iran, Afghanistan, Iraq, Turkey, southern Russia and elsewhere, became extinct. In the 1980’s the Javan Tiger became extinct. In the 1990’s the South China Tiger was last seen in the wild.
Today, the world Tiger population is believed to be below 5000. In Sumatra the population is believed to be 450-650, but under constant pressure from palm oil producers. The Tiger is extinct in Cambodia, there are 85 in Myanmar, 20 in Vietnam and 252 in Thailand.
Good for India in trying to bring back the populations there. But Tigers are still under siege in India and elsewhere, from hunting, the growth of agriculture, population development pressures, general habitat degradation, etc, etc.
TM

Mark, Petition Link – https://actions.sumofus.org/a/yum-brands-no-to-deforestation/?akid=53135.7697051.fZEEeN&rd=1&source=fwd&t=13 Magnificent rainforests in Asia and South America are being slashed and set ablaze to produce palm oil, soy, beef and paper — driving out the precious orangutans, pygmy elephants, and other endangered animals who call those trees home. But fast food giants Pizza Hut, KFC, and Taco Bell have […]

via Tell Pizza Hut, KFC and Taco Bell to get deforestation out of their restaurants! — World Animals Voice