In this curious graphic document, His Majesty King Don Alfonso XIII poses next to the Mysore marajá before an old and huge male tiger, in a hunt in India in 1933. Today there are very few tigers in that country. They were poisoned, tricked, cepeados and annihilated by the infamous poachers until almost extinction. The […]

via The tragedy of the tiger in the last century: hunting, part of the problem or solution — archyde

WWF applauds the announcement by Singapore, led by the National Parks Board (NParks), for a ban on all domestic ivory trade.This is an important step in closing Singapore’s domestic market for ivory and is the latest highlight in a series of events that showcase the country’s determined stance against illegal wildlife trade. This year alone, […]

via Singapore’s ivory ban strengthens global momentum to stop illegal wildlife trade — The Chestnut Post

KUALA LUMPUR, Sept 30 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – Palm oil from an illegal plantation inside an Indonesian rainforest home to endangered orangutans has found its way into the supply chains of major consumer brands including Unilever and Nestle, according to a U.S.-based environmental group. A Rainforest Action Network (RAN) investigation showed Asia-based palm oil traders […]

via Palm oil from ‘orangutan capital of world’ sold to major brands, says forest group — IMURNEWS

JAKARTA SO POLUTED INDONESIAN GOVERNMENT MOVING CAPITOL.


Why bother to clean it up when you can just move the Capitol to another less-polluted city. Indonesia is not exactly at the forefront of conservation as within its boundaries their sub-species of tigers, orangutans, elephants and rhinos (there are others) are at risk in that country wherever they occur, due to habitat loss, palm oil plantations, other types of farming and development, poaching, pollution,climate change, illegal logging, etc, etc; and I guess just not caring enough.
Indonesia is the worlds most populated country on a square foot basis- this is not the wildlife’s fault, though!
TM