Koala Bears Could be Extinct in the Wild in 30 Years, its Speculated!

Devastating wildfires, forestry policies, general habitat loss, climate change are all adding to the stresses on the Australian Koala population.

These little symbols of Australia are naturally delicate, and they are not fairing well in our modern age. Disease, too, has impacted the remaining populations.

We should all press anybody we can think of in Australia to do much better in terms of protecting this special little wildlife species…

Senegal Lapwing — de Wets Wild

Vanellus lugubris The Senegal Lapwing, also known as the Lesser Black-winged Plover, is a rather uncommon denizen of open savannas and woodlands with a covering of short grass, being especially fond of recently burned veld, and prone to localised migrations as soon as the grass cover grows too long for them to easily find the […]

Senegal Lapwing — de Wets Wild

Tiger At Rest — Monochromia

Tiger At Rest — Monochromia

Tigers have become extinct in Viet Nam, Cambodia and Laos in the past 15 years due to poaching for trophies, capture or exotic dining. Habit loss plays a part, too!

A hundred years ago, there were about 100,000 tigers in Asia, now down to an estimated 3900 in the wild. British overlords took tens of thousands, hunting them from elephants, in colonial times in the earlier part of the twentieth century.

TM

From The Los Angeles Times (Sammy Roth): If, like me, you live in Los Angeles — or Denver, Las Vegas, Phoenix or Salt Lake City — you drink water from the Colorado River. You probably eat vegetables grown with Colorado River water, and maybe you eat beef fed on alfalfa grown with Colorado River water. […]

via A long-simmering water battle comes to a boil in Southern California — The Los Angeles Times #ColoradoRiver #COriver #aridification — Coyote Gulch

News Release from Freiburg University A three-dimensional network of fibers makes the bark resistant to fire and rock fall The giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) has developed effective strategies to protect itself against external influences in its natural environment in the Sierra Nevada. Its bark ensures that the tree survives wild fires and rock fall almost […]

via How the giant sequoia protects itself — Natural History Wanderings