Adenium obesum swazicum The beautiful Swazi Lily is a small succulent shrub, growing only up to around 70cm high, that occurs in a small corner of South Africa’s Lowveld, northern Kwazulu-Natal, Mozambique and eSwatini (Swaziland). Sadly the Swazi Lily is critically endangered in South Africa, with over half of its habitat converted to sugarcane fields […]

via Swazi Lily — de Wets Wild

The BBC reports The world needs a single goal for fighting the loss of nature, much like the 1.5C target for climate change, according to conservation experts. Extinctions of plants and animals should be kept well below 20 per year, they propose. Last year, a UN report found that around one million species are now threatened […]

via Nature crisis: New global extinction target proposed — Natural History Wanderings

Charge a refundable deposit on bottles and bags?

WE ARE ALL RESPONSIBLE FOR THE ACCUMULATION OF PLASTIC WASTE IN THE WORLD!

WE use it, many just throw it away. That  is plastic container and bag products I’m talking about. Manufacturers manufacture it it, consumer product manufacturers put their products in it, and it goes out into the marketplaces of the whole world and WE buy it.  Then,  too many people carelessly dispose of it. Problem is it doesn’t go away! It is gathered and collected everywhere as it blows over the land, flows into our streams and rivers then into the oceans and out into the larger world.

The results of OUR using plastic packaging products can be seen everywhere- stuck to farm wire fences that the wind has carried off. We find it in our parks, in our schoolyards on our streets and in our waterways!

Fish, Whales , Albatrosses , Sea Turtles, Seals and many other living things either ingest it or are trapped by it; in any event it often times (not rarely)  leads to death of some living thing. It travels out of our waterways and into the currents of the world’s oceans there to be gathered and spun around over and over again into huge collections of TRASH, floating in ever larger pools in both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.

Plastic pollution is so  prolifically found on many East African beaches that local impoverished women collect the more valuable of it for re-selling to re-manucturers. Beaches everywhere can be collecting points in any of the world’s oceans. On some small oceanic islands  plastic garbage is becoming the main feature.

Most politicians are not concerned about it. Some are but think there is not much that can be done about it. There are a few that care but not enough of them willing to stand up and fight this deadly problem.

In third world countries where plastic bags are used the people there are often most concerned about surviving that day and are not much disposed to concern themselves as to where the plastic throw-aways go.

And to think that it was not too many decades ago that plastic products in all its many manifestations were introduced into a willing world, and little by little it has come to the point where we are today! Second only, but barely, to climate change as a major world threat, plastic pollution is dramatically changing our world, and is threatening it. It’s turning our environment into something very ugly, it is killing  fish and birds and whales which unknowingly feed on the oceans  now often deadly resources.

There are so many waterways totally plugged up with floating and semi-submersed plastic debris in some third world countries that an unsuspecting traveler would be absolutely shocked to consider that this was even possible. First world countries are not exempt either as most industrial economies have been abusing our waterfronts and waterways in so any ways for hundreds of years dumping all kinds of crap into them even setting the rivers on fire, and are still unabashedly doing so.

Somebody one day thought putting toothpaste in plastic was a good idea.

WE NEED TO PRESSURE OUR GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVES, CONSUMERS GOODS MANUFACTURERS AND PACKAGING PRODUCERS to get much more creative about packaging and get very much more interested in the current world situation in this regard.

Lets start by passing legislation in every country requiring a refundable deposit on plastic containers, bottles and bags. Sounds like a big order. YES, it surely is, but it it is doable if the worlds’ people decide they want a change…

…LETS HELP THEM DECIDE!

TM

HUMAN IMPACT IN GALAPAGOS!

In July 2015, I volunteered for a month on the island of San Cristóbal, the most eastern of the Galápagos Islands. The project, organized through Projects Abroad, focused on environmental conservation. It partnered with local national park authorities to help with various tasks: monitor sea lion populations, aid staff at the local tortoise breeding centre, collect trash from beaches, and remove invasive plant species from various areas around the island. Human interaction with the environment can often have negative repercussions; this is seen all over the world, and highlighted in this post with examples of invasive plant species introduction and risk to wildlife. So let’s talk specifically about marine life, and the thing that affected me most during my stay on San Cristóbal: the sea lions, and the effects of human interaction. By Leandra Rhodes

via Human Impact on the Galápagos Islands — Words Over Water

This 27 January 2018 video says about itself: A Giant Extinct Sea Cow The story of Steller’s Sea Cow is an important one to know. It’s a cautionary tale that everyone should be aware of, to truly appreciate the devastating effects that humans can have on the life of this planet, and the relevance of […]

via

Article and photos from hienalouca.com Palm oil is responsible for the destruction of vast swathes of forestry and is being used in products from a wide range of companies. Food giant Mondelez, which provides palm oil for Cadbury chocolate bars, Ritz crackers and Oreo biscuits, has been named as the worst offender by a Greenpeace report. The damning report found that supplying palm oil to the snacking behemoth has come at the expense of 173,000 acres (70,000 hectares) of rainforest since 2016. Extreme deforestation has pushed local wildlife into tiny corners of their habitat and has forced many species, including the critically endangered orangutans, towards the ‘brink of extinction’, Greenpeace claims. According to the report, twelve brands are using palm oil from 20 suppliers that are all all

via News Pictures – Palm oil from 12 companies driving orangutans to ‘brink of extinction’ — News Exc Celebrity

Thomas Gray, science director with conservation group Wildlife Alliance, which operates in Cambodia, says that snares — simple traps made of wire and rope — have become the single biggest threat to ground-dwelling animals in Cambodia, Vietnam, and Laos over the last decade. But the tragic thing about snares, says Gray, is that “they take […]

via ‘Barbaric’ snares are wiping out Southeast Asia’s wild animals — Pattaya News – PattayaToday