City Vs Country Hawks…

In a groundbreaking study on sparrowhawks, scientists have found that city birds in Scotland are more successful than their country cousins. In this study, researchers from RSPB Scotland and the Scottish Raptor Study Group examined differences between populations of the birds in Edinburgh and in the Ayrshire countryside over four years from 2009 to 2012. They […]

via The country hawk and the city hawk — James Common

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What is the Population of Golden Eagles?

For conservation efforts to be effective, wildlife managers need to know how many individuals of a species are out there. When species are spread out over large areas and occur at low densities, as is the case with the Golden Eagle, figuring this out can be tricky. However, a new study from The Condor: Ornithological […]

via How Many Golden Eagles Are There? — Auk & Condor Updates

Insects decline in Germany!

This video says about itself: 5 September 2017 Due to a reduction in biodiversity, insect populations have declined in Europe by as much as 80%. Educators in South Africa predict the same fate for their country. From PLOS one: More than 75 percent decline over 27 years in total flying insect biomass in protected areas […]

via Insects decline in Germany — Dear Kitty. Some blog

Young Wild Horse Deaths in Captivity!

Healthy foals with their moms in Devil’s Garden Wild Horse Territory For more info on what causes colitis in foals, read HERE. SOURCE: BLM News Release For Immediate Release: Oct. 17, 2017 Contact: Jeff Fontana, 530-252-5332 CA-N-17-57 Preliminary results for wild horse deaths at BLM corrals SUSANVILLE, Calif. – Preliminary veterinarian results indicate that 25 […]

via 25 foals die at BLM’s Litchfield Corrals in CA, BLM states likely cause is colitis — Straight from the Horse’s Heart

Desert Tawny Owl discovered in Israel.

Old Guv Legends

image_2432e-desert-tawny-owl-strix-hadorami
Image credit: © Thomas Krumenacker, www.krumenacker.de.
The newly-discovered species, named the Desert Tawny Owl, belongs to the earless owl genus, Strix.
It is a medium-sized owl, 30 to 33 centimeters long, and weighing 140 to 220 grams.
It resembles the Hume’s Owl (Strix butleri) and the Tawny Owl (Strix aluco) in plumage pattern and proportions.
The species’ scientific name, Strix hadorami, honors Israeli ornithologist and writer Hadoram Shirihai.
“It is a special pleasure to name this bird for Hadoram Shirihai, a much-valued colleague and collaborator for 20 years,” Dr Schweizer and his colleagues wrote in a paper in the journal Zootaxa.
“Although Hadoram’s ornithological interests are staggeringly wide-ranging, his name is arguably particularly synonymous with this wonderful owl of wild places in the Middle East.
He discovered, when still a young boy, a live but poisoned specimen (of the Desert Tawny Owl) in En Gedi, which became the first…

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Melting South American Glacier…

This weekend, I was reading The Economist in the tiny alpine country of Lichtenstein with a wide view over the mountains. Although snow had started to dust the peaks, a good amount had melted away. It was 70 degrees outside, 20 degrees higher than the average temperature for a mid-October day. As the sun beamed down, […]

via Far from the Arctic, Venezuela’s last glacier melts away — cryopolitics

Sea Turtle Success Story!

Jaelynn Hart / Staff Writer It’s not very often that humanity gets to pat itself on the back for having a positive effect on the environment, but scientists are labeling sea turtles as a “global conservation success story” as the population numbers rise away from the brink of extinction. Because of the many dangers causing the decline in […]

via Swimming Out of Endangered — The Last Word Magazine