SOS, a grim warning carved out of a palm oil plantation…

Lithuanian artist Ernest Zacharevic has carved a giant SOS message into an Indonesian palm oil plantation, as part of a campaign on the impact of such plantations on tribal communities and endangered species. The giant SOS signal, which the artist completed last month, runs for about a half-kilometre inside a plantation in North Sumatra, and can […]

via SOS signal carved into Sumatran palm oil plantation warns of environmental dangers — Life & Soul Magazine


Take Action To Save Wild Horses…

Last Chance to Call Congress to Save Our Wild Horse and Burros on Take Action Tuesday Congress is set to vote this week on the Spending Bill for 2018. The House’s version calls for killing 45,000 wild horses and burros in holding facilities and an additional 45,000 wild horses and burros deemed “excess” that are […]

via Urgent! Wild Horses Need Your Help on Take Action Tuesday — Straight from the Horse’s Heart

The GALAPAGOS, fast losing its lustre!

A recent study coordinated by the East Anglia University concludes that the consequences of Global warming might take out of local existence up to 50% of the Galapagos unique and rare plant and animal species by the year 2100.

On top of that, Ecuadorans from the mainland regularly poach and steal tortoises, birds and other creatures essential to the uniqueness of the island. Feral dogs, wild goats and rats also take a serious toll.

Ecuador seems unable or unwilling to properly manage this unique world heritage site for the good. This seems not much different to conditions on the mainland part of their country. Canada has issued serious travel advisories against travel in 7-8 of the country’s provinces. Issues ranging from robbery, muggings, rape, land mines, crime cartel gangs, these head the list of concerns in those parts of the country.

Countries unable to manage their unique resources due to poor economies, corruption, ability or ineptitude should make way for others to manage these irreplaceable riches. Some things like the Galapagos should be considered OWNED BY THE WORLD!

The uniqueness of the Galapagos needs to be saved, at least as it is...Darwin would be shocked to see the islands as they are now!

E. Matthews

Step Up To Save Elephants From Poachers…

© Mark Drury Photography (@markjdrury) Vancouver, BC, March 14, 2018 – The poaching of elephants has reached unprecedented levels, threatening their very survival. In the face of this crisis, Elephanatics, a Vancouver elephant advocacy non-profit group, claims Canada is not supporting the worldwide initiative to save both African and Asian elephants. At the last meeting of the […]

via STEP UP AND SAVE ELEPHANTS — Stephen Rees’s blog

Wild Horses Need Your Help!

“Our good friends and partners at Equine Advocates beat us to the punch on this news blast so we are re-blogging it here asking you to be the voice of the voiceless. Let’s dig in and get this done…it may be our last chance!!!” ~ R.T. The Lives of Wild & Domestic Equines Are Hanging […]

via Urgent! America’s Wild Horse and Burros Need You to Take Action NOW! — Straight from the Horse’s Heart

Salish Sea- a changing environment!

Underneath the picturesque Salish Sea there are churning currents, with water swooshing in from the open ocean and surges of nutrient-rich fresh water from creeks and rivers that alter the sea’s chemistry — and can make life tough for species trying to survive in a rapidly changing environment. And that’s why scientists are increasingly interested in […]

via The race for adaptation in an increasingly acidic Salish Sea — Ocean acidification

California Wildfires…

ScienceDaily reports On the tail of California’s most destructive and expensive year of firefighting ever, it might seem obvious that vegetation removal would reduce the risk of such a year happening again. But scientists are showing that in chaparral, California’s iconic shrubland ecosystem, management can devastate wild bird populations and that fire-risk reduction is only […]

via Effects Of Wildfire Management On Bird Populations — Natural History Wanderings