What on earth can we do to help? It shocked and saddened me to the core when I heard a few days ago about the huge fires raging in the Amazon rainforest. Not only had I heard nothing about it on the news, I was also totally at a loss as to what was causing […]

via The Amazon Is Burning — food fitness flora

For years, environmentalists have been warning that the world’s seemingly insatiable demand for palm oil, the reddish oil extracted from palm fruit that’s used in thousands of everyday products from margarine to cosmetics, poses a major risk to animals in the southeast Asian rainforests that are being cleared for palm cultivation. In Indonesia — a […]

via Demand for Palm Oil threatens Great Apes. — Old Guv Legends

This piece is part of a series of assessment submissions from Warwick Economics’ Introduction to Environmental Economics module for first-year students. Executive Summary Time is running out for orangutans. In 2016 the International Union for Conservation of Nature classed the species as critically endangered (Ancrenaz et al., 2016), one slip away from extinction. In the war of […]

via The Orangutan-Palm Oil Conflict — GLOBUS

Bella Lack, a 16-year-old conservation activist and youth ambassador for The Born Free Foundation, shared her encounter with the last Sumatran rhino in Malaysia on Friday, June 28, alongside a stark message – “this is what extinction looks like.” Tam, the last male Sumatran rhino in Malaysia, died in May, according to the Borneo Rhino Alliance, leaving the female Iman as the last of her species in Malaysia. “Iman is the last flickering flame of 20 million years of the evolution of her species – soon to be extinguished by us,” tweeted Lack. Lack called for people to support the conservation efforts of the Borneo Rhino Alliance. A small number of Sumatran rhinos still survive in Indonesia, according to National Geographic. Credit: Bella Lack via Storyful

via ‘This is What Extinction Looks Like’: British Conservation Activist Meets Last Sumatran Rhino in Malaysia — The Australian

rainforest-rescue.org Gorilla habitat is shrinking day by day, and one of the main drivers is the chocolate industry. In Nigeria, cocoa farms are penetrating the last refuges of the endangered primates, driven by demand from chocolate lovers the world over. We can’t let the last remaining tiny patches of gorillas’ forests be trashed for candy. […]

via Petition To Nigeria: keep cocoa growers out of gorilla habitat! — “OUR WORLD”

PLEASE SIGN!