CRITICALLY ENDANGERED HAINAN GIBBON- TM

Hainan Gibbon


The critically endangered Hainan Gibbon is not on the brink, but not far from it. A population growth of 20 in 50 years, up from 10 in 1970, is cautiously encouraging, thanks to efforts by Hong Kong and British environmental activists.
A traditionally low birth rate keeps this species in a very vulnerable state.

CRITICALLY ENDANGERED HAINAN GIBBON

Hainan Gibbon

Returning from the actual brink, but still not far from it, The Hainan Gibbon population has grown from 10 individuals in 1970 to 30 now, thanks to the efforts of Hong Kong and British environmental activists.
An increase of only 20 in 50 years can be partly accounted for by this species very low birthrates. The remaining small population is native to China.

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