The New York Times reports on a new study on Caribou migration Caribou, those stately ungulates from North America, have “long been credited with the world’s longest migration,” said Kyle Joly, a wildlife biologist with the National Park Service who studies caribou, and is the report’s lead author. But for decades, that claim relied on a […]

via Still the Undisputed Champs of Mammalian Migrations — Natural History Wanderings

According to News 6 uppermichiganssourse.com Governor Gretchen Whitmer, along with governors DeWine (R-OH), Evers (D-WI), Wolf (D-PA), Pritzker (D-IL), and Walz (D-MN), sent a to chairman and ranking member of the U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources voicing their support for the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act. “The decline of our fish and wildlife, and their […]

via Bipartisan Coalition of Great Lakes’ Governors Support the Recovery of America’s Wildlife Act. — Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin Films

What do Mountain Lions Look Like? Mountain Lions (Puma concolor), are known throughout the world as “The cat with many names”, and it is true. They go by many names that you may have heard of, such names include: Mountain Lion, Cougar, Panther, Puma, or Catamount. However, despite the many names that go with this […]

via What To Do If You Encounter A Mountain Lion: An In-depth Look Into “The Cat Of Many Names” — TrailTrek California

BACKYARD BIRD FEEDERS REALLY DO HELP

As climate change puts increasing pressure on the world’s bird populations, we can all help from our homes to provide life-sustaining feed to birds caught by unreliable and shifting seasons, drought, wildfires, and any manner of changing world climate conditions. Some species may adapt if they have enough transition time, others may not.
In the meantime, we can all help by putting out and maintaining feeders in suitable seasons and conditions. Farmers can leave two or three rows of unharvested crops at the edge of the field for birds to find over the winter. Even table scraps can be useful for some species.
Serious population and species reductions have been projected; like up to a two- thirds decline in some bird numbers in some parts of the planet. Species types, too, will be seen where they never may have been before, as these move to more comfortable environments. Others may not be seen in some areas again…
You can help!

TM

NORTH AMERICA’S BIRD SPECIES EXPECTED TO RAPIDLY DECLINE IN NUMBERS AND TYPES

Piping Plover

Two-thirds of all North American bird species are faced with an increase chance of extinction due to to the current climate crisis, according to the respected National Audubon Society.
Northern Forest and Arctic regions will see the earliest changes as increasing temperatures are fast outpacing the world averages
Journal Science estimated that climate-related pressures have led to a cumulative population loss among North American species approaching three-billion birds. Estimates vary, but all studying groups agree that things are getting very serious.

TM