Bring More Birds to Your Home With Native Plants — Natural History Wanderings

from Audubon Create your very own bird sanctuary with the help of Audubon’s Native Plants Database. Enter your 5-digit zip code to find a list of the best plants for birds in your area, as well as local resources and links to more information. Start Planting

Bring More Birds to Your Home With Native Plants — Natural History Wanderings

The Neotropical Mangrove Conservation Alliance — Repeating Islands

Birdlife International has launched the Neotropical Mangrove Conservation Alliance, also known as the Mangrove Alliance, as an online resource to foster the preservation of endangered mangrove habitats, helping to coordinate mangrove conservation activities at priority sites in the Caribbean islands. See description here: The new alliance of BirdLife Partners and other organisations aims to conserve, […]

The Neotropical Mangrove Conservation Alliance — Repeating Islands

Blue-cheeked Bee-eater — de Wets Wild

Merops persicus The Blue-cheeked Bee-eater visits South Africa during our summer months after migrating from their breeding grounds stretching from North Africa to central Asia, arriving from October and departing again by April, some stay as late as May. Locally, most Blue-cheeked Bee-eaters head for the north-coast of Kwazulu-Natal and locations in Gauteng, Mpumalanga and […]

Blue-cheeked Bee-eater — de Wets Wild

The Gift of Cranes — Jet Eliot

Sandhill Cranes, Calif. Throughout time and across the globe, cranes have symbolized longevity, wisdom, immortality, happiness and good fortune. Here is a gift of cranes as we welcome the new year. There are 15 species of cranes in the world, all in one family, Gruidae. They fall under three genera; each genera–Antigone, Balearica, Grus–is represented […]

The Gift of Cranes — Jet Eliot

I Know Why the Caged Songbird Goes Extinct — Natural History Wanderings

The Revelator reports A rampant trade in Asian birds for their beautiful songs is emptying forests of sound and life. Read story at I Know Why the Caged Songbird Goes Extinct • The Revelator

I Know Why the Caged Songbird Goes Extinct — Natural History Wanderings

Red-throated Wryneck — de Wets Wild

Jynx ruficollis A member of the woodpecker family, the Red-throated Wryneck is a specialist species tied closely to moist grasslands with a meagre scattering of trees. They feed mainly on the ground, dining exclusively on ants and termites, licking them up with an exceptionally long and sticky tongue. Red-throated Wrynecks are usually encountered singly or […]

Red-throated Wryneck — de Wets Wild

African Birds, Terrestrial Brownbul — de Wets Wild

Phyllastrephus terrestris The Terrestrial Brownbul is a shy inhabitant of forests and thickets, skulking in the undergrowth where it turns over the leaf litter looking for insects and other invertebrates, small reptiles, fruit and seeds. Outside of the breeding season they form small groups of up to six individuals, but during the breeding season, which […]

Terrestrial Brownbul — de Wets Wild

America’s Bald Eagle Population Has Quadrupled, Wildlife Officials Say — Natural History Wanderings

NPR reports The number of bald eagles in the lower 48 U.S. states — a population once on the brink of extinction — has quadrupled in the last dozen years to more than 316,000, federal wildlife officials say, despite steep declines in other American bird populations. A new survey by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service […]

America’s Bald Eagle Population Has Quadrupled, Wildlife Officials Say — Natural History Wanderings

California Condors to Return to Pacific Northwest — Natural History Wanderings

Redwood National and State Parks (NPS) reports After 100 years, California condors will soon soar home in the Pacific Northwest. They were once common a sight in this area, revered by many Northwest tribes since time immemorial, yet they’ve been absent from this portion of their historic range for decades. With the help of our […]

California Condors to Return to Pacific Northwest — Natural History Wanderings