BACKYARD BIRD FEEDERS REALLY DO HELP

As climate change puts increasing pressure on the world’s bird populations, we can all help from our homes to provide life-sustaining feed to birds caught by unreliable and shifting seasons, drought, wildfires, and any manner of changing world climate conditions. Some species may adapt if they have enough transition time, others may not.
In the meantime, we can all help by putting out and maintaining feeders in suitable seasons and conditions. Farmers can leave two or three rows of unharvested crops at the edge of the field for birds to find over the winter. Even table scraps can be useful for some species.
Serious population and species reductions have been projected; like up to a two- thirds decline in some bird numbers in some parts of the planet. Species types, too, will be seen where they never may have been before, as these move to more comfortable environments. Others may not be seen in some areas again…
You can help!

TM

Yellow Water is part of the South Alligator River floodplain and is located in the centre of Kakadu National Park. About one third of Australia’s birdlife can be found in Kakadu and what better place to find some of them but on the wetlands. As I mentioned in my previous blog, wherever there is water […]

via Yellow Water, Kakadu National Park — Sandra Broom

The Guardian reports The increasingly appetising buffet provided for garden birds, from sunflower hearts to suet cakes, is supporting a rising number and greater diversity of species in Britain’s urban areas, according to research. In the 1970s, half of all birds using garden feeders belonged to just two species, the sparrow and starling, but by the 2010s […]

via Garden feeders are supporting rising numbers of urban birds  — Natural History Wanderings

We had been birding the Belizean tropical jungle for days, when a new phenomenon greeted us one dawn morning: clouds of butterflies congregating around the ground. Up until then, we had been seeing that same species, the Dark Kite-swallowtail butterfly, flying around all week. One or two, here and there, on flowers–like usual. […]

via Thirsty Butterflies — Jet Eliot