All hell is breaking lose down under, By SunBôw Photo: Bairnsdale, Victoria, Australia, Dec 30, 2019, 10 pm… Bairnsdale is the first town I visited in Australia 3 weeks ago. It’s a couple hours drive east of where I am now, in eastern Victoria. Tonight a vast region around Bairnsdale looks like hell as up […]

via All hell is breaking lose down under — Sasquatch Close Encounter Network for Interspecies Communication

In many areas, Australia’s temperate zones and coastal ecosystems have been extensively altered, many wetlands have been degraded. Climate change, and introduced plants and animals (invasives), are the agents of the radical changes that are tearing through Australia’s environment. The result? Dramatic declines in the distribution and abundance of many species, with natural resources such […]

via Environmental Issues in Australia —

Australian Budgie Convention!

This week’s ABC Open Pic of the Week is a chatter of budgerigars looking more like a swarm of budgies near Onslow, Western Australia. Image Credit: Photograph by ABC Open contributor D. Joshua Brunner. Source: Pic of the Week budgie swarm – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

via ‘A Chatter of Budgies’ Onslow, WA. — Old Guv Legends

Guest essay by Eric Worrall Climate scientists have expressed their dismay that Aussie politicians are not treating this year’s awful bushfire season as a wakeup call for climate action. Leading scientists condemn political inaction on climate change as Australia ‘literally burns’ Climate experts ‘bewildered’ by government ‘burying their heads in the sand’, and say bushfires […]

via “Bewildered” Climate Scientists: Aussie Politicians are Still Not Listening — Watts Up With That?

Image CC0 Public Domain This article was originally published by the University of Western Australia. Read the original article. New research from The University of Western Australia has shed light on why some invasive plants make a better comeback after a fire, outstripping native species in the race for resources. The findings, published today in Nature…

via Scientists uncover how invasive plants gain a head start after fire — The Invasives Blog

‘There will be winners and losers’ By Summit Voice SUMMIT COUNTY — Global warming impacts to coral reefs are not some far-fetched future scenario, but something that is happening right now, leading marine scientists said this week during the opening session of the International Coral Reef Symposium in Cairns, Australia. A panel of top researchers […]

via Global warming: Coral reefs will change … and not for the better, experts say at global reef powwow — Summit County Citizens Voice