Calidris pugnax A large population of the Ruff migrates annually to South Africa to spend the austral summer here, the first birds arriving from August and the last departing back to breed in northern Europe and Siberia by April. A few individuals choose to remain here throughout our winter. They’re mostly seen at and around […]

via Ruff — de Wets Wild

Belenois creona The African Common White is widely distributed on the continent south of the Sahara, extending into Arabia and also to Madagascar. In South Africa they can be found in the Eastern Cape, Kwazulu-Natal, Gauteng, Mpumalanga, Limpopo and marginally into the Free Sate and North West. This distribution reflects their preference for savanna habitats. […]

via African Common White — de Wets Wild

Dessonornis humeralis The White-throated Robin-Chat is endemic to southern Africa, occurring in Botswana, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, Swaziland and South Africa’s North West, Gauteng, Limpopo, Mpumalanga and Kwazulu-Natal provinces, where it inhabits savanna habitats and riverine thickets and feeds on insects, other invertebrates, and fruit. White-throated Robin-Chats are usually seen in monogamous pairs and breed in spring […]

via White-throated Robin-Chat — de Wets Wild

Apis mellifera Two closely related subspecies of Honey Bee are commonly found in South Africa, the Cape Honey Bee from the Western Cape being more aggressive than the African Honey Bee that occurs from the Karoo northwards to Ethiopia and Sudan (distribution map). They were also imported to Brazil from whence they spread all over […]

via African Honey Bee — de Wets Wild

Amauris albimaculata The sedate and elegant Layman inhabits forests, woodlands and savannas, occurring from the Eastern Cape through Kwazulu Natal into the Lowveld of Mpumalanga and Limpopo, and from there as far north as Cameroon and Ethiopia. They fly slow and high, descending only to feed on flowers and alkaloids seeping from damaged and wilted […]

via Layman — de Wets Wild

Ardea purpurea One of our shier heron species, despite its impressive size, the Purple Heron inhabits densely vegetated shallow wetlands, reedbeds and riverbanks, seldom emerging into the open. They feed mainly on fish, frogs, small mammals and birds, and crabs and other aquatic invertebrates and is most active around dawn and dusk. The Purple Heron […]

via Purple Heron — de Wets Wild